Loudon Elementary School

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Past Assignments

Due:

Track Day
Some 4th and 5th grade students will be attending the track meet in Lenoir City.
 using a s
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Poetry 
Review rhyme and rhyme scheme
- couplet 
Students will be writing couplets 

Due:

FARM DAY
 
All students should wear closed toe shoes.  We will be traveling to the Sweetwater Valley Cheese Farm.

Due:

Goals:
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
 
Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.
Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms and proverbs
 
Reading: 
What is poetry? What makes it different from prose? (Review)
Look at sample poems and find rhyme scheme (Time to Rhyme page)
Figurative Language review (similes, metaphors, idioms)
 
 
 
Similes worksheet 
 
IXL E.2, E.3, E.4, Y.1, Y.2, Y. 3, Y.4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Make connections between the print version of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the same text.
 
"Bridge to Terabithia" movie (conclusion)
 
Compare and Contrast writing - with rubric 
 
Students will compare and contrast the novel Bridge to Terabithia with the movie. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Make connections between the print version of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the same text.
 
"Bridge to Terabithia" movie
 
Compare and Contrast writing - with rubric 
 
Students will compare and contrast the novel Bridge to Terabithia with the movie. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Make connections between the print version of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the same text.
 
"Bridge to Terabithia" movie
 
Students will be given a graphic organizer to begin noting things that are the same and things that are different between the novel and the movie. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

TNReady Testing - Science 

Due:

TNReady Testing - Math parts 2 and 3

Due:

Goals:
 
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.
Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms and proverbs
 
Reading: 
What is poetry? What makes it different from prose? (Review)
Look at sample poems and find rhyme scheme (Time to Rhyme page)
Figurative Language review (similes, metaphors, idioms)
 
 
 
Chapter 13 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

TNReady Testing - ELA Part 4 & Math Part 1

Due:

TNReady Testing - ELA Parts 2 & 3

Due:

FIELD TRIP - Tennessee Smokies game
 

Due:

Goals:
 
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
What is poetry? What makes it different from prose?
Look at sample poems
Figurative Language review (similes, metaphors)
TNReady practice questions with poetry
 
 
 
Chapter 12 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
 
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
What is poetry? What makes it different from prose?
Look at sample poems
Figurative Language review (similes, metaphors)
TNReady practice questions with poetry
 
 
 
Chapter 10 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
What is poetry? What makes it different from prose?
Look at sample poems
TNReady practice questions with poetry
 
 
 
Chapter 10 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and
information.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.

 
Writing:
ELA TNReady Part 1 writing
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and
information.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.

 
Writing:
Review the 3 modes of writing (opinion, informative, narrative)
Look at exemplars/rubric of all
Review sample prompts and characteristics of level 3/4 writing
 
Chapter 9 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and
information.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.

 
Writing:
Review the 3 modes of writing (opinion, informative, narrative)
Look at exemplars/rubric of opinion writing
Practice writing for Which pet is the best? Dogs or Cats 
 
Chapter 9 of Bridge to Terabithia
Spelling: VCCV words (support, effort, collect)
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and
information.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.

 
Writing:
Review the 3 modes of writing (opinion, informative, narrative)
Look at exemplars/rubric of informational
Hang gliding text with modeling of writing
Practice round of writing using 2018 Item Release
 
 
Spelling: VCCV words (support, effort, collect)
 
 

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine a new AR goal. All students will be reviewing the data from their previous test prior to testing. (All students who improve on their reading level will receive a canned soda during recess).
 
IXL REVIEW and EPIC for early finisher students/corrections on any work
 
Chapter 8 of Bridge to Terabithia

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: practice passages with theme, summary, and description of characters, setting, and events (Salt in His Shoes)
 
Theme and summary assessment 
 
Finish reading Chapter 7 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
Make-up assignments and/or corrections to assignments
 
 
Spelling: VCCV words (support, effort, collect)
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: practice passages with theme, summary, and description of characters, setting, and events (The Invisible Boy) (Chapter 6 of Bridge to Terabithia)
 
Begin reading Chapter 7 of Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
 
 
Spelling: VCCV words (support, effort, collect)
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
 
Theme Practice 
Readworks: "Twins' Luck" (graded assignment)
Spelling: VCCV words (vowel, consonant, consonant, vowel words)
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: Summary practice 
Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 6 Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Writing: Summary of Chapter 6 with partner sharing and peer review (feedback)
 
 
Spelling: VCCV words (vowel, consonant, consonant, vowel words)
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: practice passages with theme, summary, and description of characters, setting, and events (taken from common assessment)
 
Summary of Chapter 5 Bridge to Terabithia
 
Writing:  Review Character map of Jess
Character Map for Leslie (graded assignment)
 
Spelling: VCCV words

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading:  Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 5 Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Why were Jess and Leslie finally motivated to stand up to Janice Avery? How did their plan work? Why did Jess say “poor ‘ol Janice? What was Leslie learning through his example?
How did pretending to be giant killers in Terabithia help Jess and Leslie have the courage to stand up to a bully in real life?
 
Theme Practice 
Readworks: "The Lottery" (graded assignment)
Spelling: VCCV words (vowel, consonant, consonant, vowel words)
 
 

Due:

Revised Schedule due to INCENTIVE TRIP to FLMS
 
Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
 
 
Reading:  getepic.com Reading and AR testing
 
Spelling: Introduction of VCCV words (vowel, consonant, consonant, vowel words)
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: practice passages with theme, summary, and description of characters, setting, and events (taken from common assessment)
Theme and summary assessment 
 
 
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment  assessment 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading:  Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 5 Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Why were Jess and Leslie finally motivated to stand up to Janice Avery? How did their plan work? Why did Jess say “poor ‘ol Janice? What was Leslie learning through his example?
How did pretending to be giant killers in Terabithia help Jess and Leslie have the courage to stand up to a bully in real life?
Summarize Chapter 5/Describe Janice Avery
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment 
 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading:  Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 4 (Part 2) Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (YOU do) important events from each page (Post-it notes for each page/section)
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment 
Writing:  
Describe in depth Miss Edmunds using evidence from the text.  (Graded assignment)

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
Theme mini-lesson with practice
Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 4 (Part 1) Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (YOU do) important events from each page (Post-it notes for each page/section)
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment 
Writing: Write an alternate ending to Chapter 3 (beginning after the bell rang).

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
ReadWorks passage "The Magic Glasses"
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment 
 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading:  Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 4 (Part 2) Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (YOU do) important events from each page (Post-it notes for each page/section)
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment 
Writing:  
Describe in depth Miss Edmunds using evidence from the text.  (Graded assignment)

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
Theme mini-lesson with practice
Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 4 (Part 1) Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (YOU do) important events from each page (Post-it notes for each page/section)
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment 
Writing: Write an alternate ending to Chapter 3 (beginning after the bell rang).

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading:  Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 3 Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (YOU do) important events from each page (Post-it notes for each page/section)
Spelling: suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment (using suffix to determine meaning)
Writing: Using the post-it notes, write a  3 sentence summary of Chapter 3.  This will be a scored assignment.

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading: 
Summarizing Mini-lesson
Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 2 Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (WE do) important events from each page (Post-it notes for each page/section)
Spelling:  suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment
Writing: Using the post-it notes, write a  3 sentence summary of Chapter 2. 

Due:

Goals:
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Reading:  Bridge to Terabithia Chapter 1 Vocab introduction/read and discuss
Summary (I do) important events from each page (Think Aloud for students)
Spelling:  suffixes -ful, -less, -ness, -ment
Writing: Jesse Aarons paragraph (describe character) with text evidence
 

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading:
summarizing assessment
 
Spelling :  list /k/,/ng/, and /kw/ assessment
 
 
IXL: 
 

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading:
ReadWorks "Sneaky Snakes" (to pair with Python Invasion)
 
Spelling :  list /k/,/ng/, and /kw/
 
IXL: 
 

Due:

3rd 9 weeks Common Assessment Part 2
 
All 4th graders in the county will complete this assessment to determine areas that need reteaching and review before the TNReady assessment.

Due:

3rd 9 weeks Common Assessment Part 1
 
All 4th graders in the county will complete this assessment to determine areas that need reteaching and review before the TNReady assessment.

Due:

Goal:  Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text,
including what happened and why, based on specific information in a text.
Determine text structure.
 
Spelling: /k/, /ng/, and /kw/
 
Reading : The Most Magnificent Thing Read Aloud with questioning
How did the character respond each time?
What could she have done differently?
 
Text structures review
 
Grammar : Prepositional phrases

Due:

Goal:  Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text,
including what happened and why, based on specific information in a text.
Determine text structure.
 
Spelling: /k/, /ng/, and /kw?
 
Reading : summarizing assessment
Begin Inventions text set (video with discussion questions) What is an invention? inventor?
Writing: most important inventions graffiti wall 
 
Grammar : Prepositional phrases

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading: summarizing (LearnZillion)
determine structure
 
Python Invasion Article with questions
 
Spelling :  list /k/,/ng/, and /kw/
 
 
 
 
IXL: 
 

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine a new AR goal. All students will be reviewing the data from their previous test prior to testing. (All students who improve on their reading level will receive a canned soda during recess).
 
IXL REVIEW for early finisher students/corrections on any work
 

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading: summarizing practice/review
 
Spelling :  list of /k/,/ng/, and /kw/
 
Assessment from Coach book - Storm Chasers (TNReady type questions)
 
 
IXL: 
 

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading: summarizing practice/review
 
Spelling :  list of /k/,/ng/, and /kw/
 
Assessment from Coach book - Storm Chasers (TNReady type questions)
 
 
IXL: 
 

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading: summarizing (LearnZillion)
determine structure
 
Spelling : Introduction of new list /k/,/ng/, and /kw/
 
Bird text with writing a summary practice (TNReady type questions)
 
 
IXL: 
 

Due:

Goals: refer to details and examples when explaining what the text says explicitly, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - final long e (assessment) 

 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 23-25 
picture book (Boston Tea Party)
 
Writing - Review explanatory/informative writing format and look at rubric.
 
Students will reflect about what they need to improve to score a 3 or 4 on TNReady Writing Assessment.
 
Students will write an explanation of what happened the night of the Boston Tea Party using text evidence from both texts.
 
 
Tug of War activity about the Boston Tea Party
 
 

Due:

Goals:  determine the main idea and explain how it is supported by details,
             summarize the text, describe the overall structure of in a text or part of a text
 
Reading: main idea strategy (text - "Ever Wondered Who Invented Pizza?")
determine structure
 
Spelling : Final long e sound (analogy)
 
Speaking and Listening: Partners will discuss events that happened chronologically in the invention of pizza text.
 
Tornado Safety text with TNReady type questions (Coach book)
 
 

Due:

Goals:  Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - final long e (sorting activity)
 
Reading  - Let It Begin Here text and Paul Revere bio video
Who is Paul Revere? Why was his ride important?  How do people think the ride happened?
 
Writing - Using evidence from both the text and the video, prove that Paul Revere was a Patriot.  
 
 
 

Due:

Goals: refer to details and examples when explaining what the text says explicitly, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - final long e (sorting activity) 
Assessment on this list will take place February 15th.
 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 23-25 
picture book (Boston Tea Party)
 
Writing - Review explanatory/informative writing format and look at rubric
Students will write an explanation of what happened the night of the Boston Tea Party using text evidence from both texts.
 
 
Tug of War activity about the Boston Tea Party
 
 

Due:

Goal:   Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
a. Introduce a topic.
determine main idea, explain how it is supported by key details
 
Spelling:  final long e words
Assessment - February 15th
 
Reading and Writing: 
Writing vocabulary (prompt, hook, conventions, development, language)
Students will look at rubric and graphic organizer for informative writing and will begin constructing hooks for explanatory writing.  We will also discuss transition words and phrases and a closing. Students are working on a prompt about TASTE from the TNready practice writing assessments. 
 

Due:

Goal:   Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information.
a. Introduce a topic.
determine main idea, explain how it is supported by key details
 
Spelling:  final long e words
Assessment - February 15th
 
Reading and Writing: 
Writing vocabulary (prompt, hook, conventions, development, language)
Students will look at rubric and graphic organizer for informative writing and will begin constructing hooks for explanatory writing.  We will also discuss transition words and phrases and a closing. Students are working on a prompt about TASTE from the TNready practice writing assessments. 
 

Due:

Goals:  Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - final long e (sorting activity)
 
Reading  - Let It Begin Here text and Paul Revere bio video
Who is Paul Revere? Why was his ride important?  How do people think the ride happened?
 
Writing - Using evidence from both the text and the video, prove that Paul Revere was a Patriot.  
 
 
 

Due:

Goals: refer to details and examples when explaining what the text says explicitly, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - final long e (sorting activity) 
Assessment on this list will take place February 8th.
 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 23-25 
picture book (Boston Tea Party)
 
Writing - Review explanatory/informative writing format and look at rubric
Students will write an explanation of what happened the night of the Boston Tea Party using text evidence from both texts.
 
 
Tug of War activity about the Boston Tea Party
 
 

Due:

Goals:  Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
 
 
Reading  - Cold Read from ReadWorks "Colonization and the Revolutionary War: Introduction to the Revolutionary War"
 
Students will read and answer questions about the informational text.
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:  Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling -
 
Reading  - Cold Read from ReadWorks "Colonization and the Revolutionary War: Introduction to the Revolutionary War"
 
Students will read and answer questions about the text.
 
 
 

Due:

Goals: refer to details and examples when explaining what the text says explicitly, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling
 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 23-25 
picture book (Boston Tea Party)
 
Writing - Review explanatory/informative writing format and look at rubric
Students will write an explanation of what happened the night of the Boston Tea Party using text evidence from both texts.
 
 
Tug of War activity about the Boston Tea Party
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling -  introduction of long e words (test will be on February 8th)
 
Reading  - informational text  George vs. George  along with information about The Sugar Act, The Quartering Act, The Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, and The Tea Act
Students are in a group and have been assigned an act. Students are creating a PowerPoint for the class that will be presented. The scoring rubric is attached. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling -  assessment for  au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - informational text  George vs. George  along with information about The Sugar Act, The Quartering Act, The Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, and The Tea Act
Students will be in a group and assigned an act. Students must create a PowerPoint for the class. The scoring rubric is attached. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals:  Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling -Test for au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - Cold Read from ReadWorks "Colonization and the Revolutionary War: Introduction to the Revolutionary War"
 
Students will read and answer questions about the text.
 
 
 

Due:

Goals: refer to details and examples when explaining what the text says explicitly, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - practice with au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 23-25 
picture book (Boston Tea Party)
 
Writing - Students will write an  explanation of what happened the night of the Boston Tea Party using text evidence from both texts.
 
 
Tug of War activity about the Boston Tea Party
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - practice with au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - informational text  George vs. George  along with information about The Sugar Act, The Quartering Act, The Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, and The Tea Act
Students will be in a group and assigned an act and must create a PowerPoint for the class. Introduction to PowerPoint will be given during class time on January 15th and students will create a 3 slide PowerPoint about themselves to become familiar with the program. 
 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - practice with au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  -  (1/15/21019)informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 18-22 
Causes of the American Revolution primary source reader pg. 12-13 (compare the 2 texts) 
 
Writing - (1/15/2019) Students will write a journal entry about the Boston Massacre and the events that led to it choosing to be either a British soldier or colonist. Students must retell the events using complete sentences.(point of view)
 
 
Focus Goal of Main Idea - We will read 2 texts and answer text based questions. These question types will be similar to those on the main idea assessment and TNReady. 
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - practice with au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - informational text  George vs. George  along with information about The Sugar Act, The Quartering Act, The Stamp Act, The Townshend Acts, and The Tea Act
Students will be in a group and assigned an act and must create a PowerPoint for the class. Introduction to PowerPoint will be given in this class time. 
 
Main Idea - assessment with questions that are based upon text
 
 
 
 

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine a new AR goal. All students will be reviewing the data from their previous test prior to testing. (All students who improve on their reading level will receive a canned soda during recess).
 
IXL REVIEW for early finisher students
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - practice with au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 18-22 with questioning
 
Students will write a letter from King George III to the colonists explaining why taxes are needed. (point of view)
 
Main Idea - We will read 2 texts and answer text based questions. These question types will be similar to those on the main idea assessment and TNReady. 
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - practice with au, aw, ou, and ow sound words
 
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George pg. 16-17
Main Idea - revisit Meerkats text/review video
 
Students will complete ReadWorks "School of Skate" article and question set.
 
 

Due:

Goals: determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details, produce complete sentences, spell grade appropriate words correctly
 
Spelling - Introduction of new list (au, aw, ou, ow) The spelling test for this list will be administered on Friday, January 18th.
Vocabulary - revolution (forcible overthrow of a government)
Reading  - informational text with questioning George vs. George to pg. 15
Writing - Using a TChart created from evidence in the text, students will write a compare/contrast paragraph for George Washington and King George III.
 
 

Due:

Cold Read Practice with Main Idea & Blood on the River Chapter 24 and 25
Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
 
Vocabulary:  
Blood on the River Chapter 24 and 25 Questioning
All Samuel’s new knowledge and experiences lead to Captain Smith’s decision to release him from servitude and apprentice him to John Laydon. How might this affect Samuel’s future and the contributions he will make to the colony?
How does what Samuel learned from Rev. Hunt help him as he prepares to say goodbye to Captain Smith and Richard?
There are several places in the story where the author conveys Samuel’s worry about other colonists’ survival. Explain which colonists are most vulnerable and why.
 
What is the most important lesson Captain Smith hopes Samuel has learned?
Why has Captain Smith chosen to leave James Town?
 
 
Students will read a text that they have not previously read or seen.  Students will answer questions about the text and must include text evidence to justify the answers. Questions will focus on main idea of a story. 
IXL Main idea practice for students who finish Readworks assignment.

Due:

Common Assessment - 2nd 9 weeks
 
Students will read passages and answer questions based on the passages. All questions assess standards that we have worked on in this 9 weeks.  In addition, students will answer grammar questions that are not based upon the passages. This is a common assessment for all 4th graders within Loudon County and has questions similar to those that students will see on TNReady.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 22 and 23 with Main Idea
Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. 
 
 
Vocabulary:  
 
Reading: Main Idea practice  (non-fiction texts)
IXL A.1 and I.1
Chapter 22 and 23 with questioning
 
What is Captain Smith’s motivation to leave Samuel in the Warraskoyack village?
Samuel learns many things while in the village. What will be the most helpful to him and his colony?
How has James Town changed while Samuel was away?
How do the new colonists action endanger the entire colony?
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 20 and 21 with Main Idea
Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.  
 
 
Vocabulary:  
 
Reading: Main Idea mini-lesson and practice  (non-fiction texts)
 
Chapter 20 and 21 with questioning
Namontack is very loyal to his tribe’s way of life. How does it compare to the colonists’ way of doing things?
Why does Samuel tell John Laydon that Miss Ann Burras likes flowers?
How does Samuel’s acquisition of the Algonquin language affect his ability to interact with the Virginia natives?
Why does Captain Smith trust the words of a little girl?
 
The Virginia Company give orders from London to be carried out in the New World. Why does Captain Smith find this so problematic?
What gift does Reverent Hunt give Samuel? How does it influence Samuel?
 
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 18 and 19/Text Structures Practice
 4.RI.CS.5  Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
Vocabulary:  
 
Reading: Text Structures Review and practice 
IXL C.5
 
Chapter 18 and 19 with questioning
 
What does Samuel mean by the phrase, “Our circle has become bigger”?
Quote on pg.137 “We start to rebuild right away, with everyone working hard.” How does this statement reflect the change that has happened in the colony?
What does Samuel discover while talking with Namontack?
Reread the last two paragraphs on page 143. How do all the events leading up to this contribute to the colony’s choice for president?
 
What is the significance of Captain Smith writing the story of the James Town colony? Why do the colonists have such a strong reaction to the women joining the colony? Why is Captain Smith so angry about King James’ instructions to crown Powhatan an English prince? Describe what Ann’s experience in the colony has been like so far.

Due:

Spelling Test - Homophones list/Cold Read assessment for Main Idea
 
Students will be choosing the correct spelling of the word.  Additionally, students must determine the appropriate homophone to complete the sentence.
(Example:  I couldn't wait/weight for Christmas to get here!)
 
Students will read a text that they have not previously read or seen.  Students will answer questions about the text and must include text evidence to justify the answers.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 17 with Main Idea
 
Spelling: Homophones with analogies and sentences
 
Vocabulary:  smoldering, nimble, engulfs, quell
 
Reading: Main Idea practice 
IXL A.1 and I.1
Chapter 17 with questioning
What changes occur in the colony with the return of Captain Newport?
What is Samuel’s first encounter with Pocahontas like?
How does the fire affect the colonists and their future?
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 15 and 16 with Main Idea
 
Spelling: Homophones with analogies and sentences
 
Vocabulary:  oration, throne, seized, pummel, miracle
 
Reading: Main Idea practice  (fiction and non-fiction texts)
IXL A.1 and I.1
Chapter 15 and 16 with questioning
Although the commoners feel hopeless, Captain Smith swiftly and effectively deals with the fleeing gentlemen upon his return. He also manages to not go back on his word to Chief Powhatan without actually giving the tribe weapons.
What skills does he possess that allow him successfully do these things?
Once again, the gentlemen seek to do away with Captain Smith. Why do they feel threatened by him?
What miracle occurs at the end of the chapter?
What implications does it come with?
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 14 with Main Idea
 
Spelling: Homophones with analogies and sentences
 
Vocabulary:  exhorting, tuppence (4 cents), hearth, ember
 
Reading: Main Idea mini-lesson and practice  (fiction and non-fiction texts)
 
Chapter 14 with questioning
How has the friendship of the natives affected the colony? As the colonists prepare for the winter, there are some changes among some of the gentlemen. What do you think prompted this change? How do actions change when Captain Smith is away? What is Samuel discovering about friendship?
 
 

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine a new AR goal. All students will be reviewing the data from their previous test prior to testing. (All students who improve on their reading level will receive a canned soda during recess).
 
Spelling - homophones
 
If all students finish, we will read and discuss Blood on the River Chapter 13
Vocabulary: dole, drenching, compulsion
Questioning:
Why is it important for Samuel and Richard to become friends?
How are the natives who come to the colony different than the ones the settlers have been fighting with?
How does Captain Smith’s knowledge and skill benefit the colony?
 

Due:

Informational Text Structures
4.RI.CS.5  Students will describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
Problem and Solution text structure
 
Students will read a variety of informational texts and determine the structure used in the text.
 
There will be a review of all types of text structures and students will be given a formative assessment to check student understanding.  10 questions from the attached will be included and students will also be asked to identify/underline text evidence to justify the chosen structure.

Due:

Informational Text Structures
4.RI.CS.5  Students will describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
Cause and Effect text structure
 
Students will read a variety of informational texts and determine the structure used in the text.
 
Students will determine which of 2 texts uses the cause and effect text structure and cite evidence from the text to show why.

Due:

Informational Text Structures
4.RI.CS.5  Students will describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
Compare and Contrast text structure
 
Students will read a variety of informational texts and determine the structure used in the text.
 
Students will use a text to complete a Venn Diagram about 2 objects or people from the text.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 13
 
Spelling: Homophones with analogies and sentences
 
Vocabulary:  dole, drenching, compulsion
 
Reading:  Chapter 13 with questioning
Why is it important for Samuel and Richard to become friends? How are the natives who come to the colony different than the ones the settlers have been fighting with? How does Captain Smith’s knowledge and skill benefit the colony?
 
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 12
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Students will use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Introduction of homophone list (Test on December 7th)
 
Reading Skill:  Context Clues (flipchart and practice with text excerpts) IXL AA.1,2,3,4
Vocabulary:  interceded, arsenic, ally
 
Chapter 12 Blood on the River (reading with questioning)
What does Captain Smith consider more powerful than a sword? Why? Two important events occur in June. Make a prediction about how each event could affect the colony later. How does greed affect the colony? Samuel makes a decision based on love. How is his character changing and growing from the boy we met in chapter 1 stealing a locket?
 
 
 
Writing:Write an alternate ending to this chapter depicting what might have happened if Samuel had chosen out of anger.
 
 

Due:

Assessment for theme, context clues, story elements
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Students will use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
 
Reading Skill:  Context Clues (flipchart and practice with text excerpts) IXL AA.1,2,3,4
 
Spelling/Phonics: test day for oo words (booth, stool, wool)
 
Students will be completing an assessment using a passage that they have not seen before.   This is to assess the students' ability to apply the skills we have been learning to a new piece of text. 
 
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 11 
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Students will use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: oo digraph sounds as in booth or in wool
 
Performance Coach:  Coached Example (Block 1 and 2) Finish with block 3
 
 
 
Reading Skill:  Context Clues (flipchart and practice)
Vocabulary:  altar, reluctantly, trudge, impaled
 
Chapter 11 Blood on the River (reading with questioning)
What allows the work of building the palisade to move quickly? Captain Smith give Samuel a chance to channel some of his energy. How is this experience different than other times Samuel has tried to learn something new?
 
T-Chart comparing cleaning the sword to fighting with a sword - Use text evidence to show how the events were different.
 
 
 
 

Due:

Spelling Test
We have had the same list for 2 weeks. In small groups, we have worked on the words and have  done a variety of practice.  .  
 
List 6 contains words that have the vowel digraph oo (bloom, cookbook)
 

Due:

Assessment for theme, context clues, story elements
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Students will use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text.
Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, and concepts of information in a text or part of a text.
 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: oo digraph sounds as in booth or in wool
 
Students will be completing an assessment using a passage that they have not seen before.   This is to assess the students' ability to apply the skills we have been learning to a new piece of text. 
 
Informational text structures mini lesson

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 10 with Narrative Writing
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Students will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.  a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation, using a narrator, and/or introducing characters. 
  
 
Spelling/Phonics: oo sound like in bloom or in crooked (sorting activity)
Reading/TNReady practice:  text excerpt from Blood on the River
 
Vocabulary:  sermons, bristles, moored (Block 1 and 2)
Chapter 10 Blood on the River (reading with questioning)(Block 1 and 2)
 
Block 3
Reading: Review tweets and Performance Coach: Coached Example 
Vocabulary: Folktale
Grammar: Punctuating Dialogue (quick review)
 
 
 (Block 1 and 2)
Writing:  Students will create a tweet from Samuel Collier about the events leading up to the attack and the death of James.  A rubric will be used to assess the tweet to ensure that students have met the learning goal.
 
Informational Text Structures Mini lesson for all blocks

Due:

Spelling List, Practice, and Test
We will have the same list for 2 weeks. In small groups, we will work on the words and do a variety of practice.  Students will have the spelling test on 11/16/18.  
 
List 6 contains words that have the vowel digraph oo (booth, cookbook)
 

Due:

Summarizing Assessment/Spelling Assessment
Students will summarize the text.
Students will spell grade appropriate words correctly.
Students will refer to details and examples in the text.
Students will  use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech.
Students will determine the meaning of simple similes and metaphors. 
 
Finish post-it note summary of Chapter 9
Spelling - Test on long u and short u words
 
 
AR reading and testing (as finish)
 

Due:

Chapter 9 Blood on the River/Summarizing
 
Students will summarize the text. 
Students will refer to details and examples when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 
 
Spelling/Phonics: analogies and sentence for long u and short u words
 
Vocabulary:  ruckus, encouraging, objection, palisade, lulling
Reading:  Summarizing Mini Lesson
Chapter 9 intro to 69 with questions and post-it summary 
 
How might Captain Smith’s knowledge about the Virginia Indians help the settlers? Why do some of the men fight against Captain Smith being on the council? (Obvious and hidden motives) What led to the decision to settle on the peninsula? What does Samuel do in this chapter that shows he is considering changing some of his behavior toward others? What are some of the tasks that must be completed in order to create a settlement? Why are the natives willing to trade food for trinkets? What sparks fear in the settlement? Why does Samuel change his behavior toward James?

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 7 & 8 with Narrative Writing
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text.
Students will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.  a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation, using a narrator, and/or introducing characters. 
 
Students will demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.
i. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long u and short u sound words (sorting by long u and short u)
Vocabulary:  sermon, exalted, teeming, cannibals
Chapter 7 Blood on the River (reading with questioning)
What does Captain Smith’s story about being captured by the Turks reveal about his character?
How do Rev. Hunt’s actions save Captain Smith?
What does he ask for in return?
 
Reading:  Chapter 8 with questions
Mini Lesson on similes (similes in text pg. 52, 53, 56)
How does life on the ship compare with the time spent on the islands? What lesson does Captain Smith insist Samuel must learn? How has Captain Smith shown Samuel an example of channeling his anger? Use the text on pg 59 to explain how Master Wingfield and Captain Smith’s priorities are different. How might the settlers’ first encounter with the natives alter their thinking about settling Virginia?
 
Writing:  Introduction of Narrative Rubric
 

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine a new AR goal. All students will be reviewing the data from their previous test prior to testing. (All students who improve on their reading level will receive a canned soda during recess).
 
Spelling - Introduction of long u and short u words Testing will take place on Friday, November 2nd.
 
IXL - point of view, analyzing characters, comparing and contrasting characters (Students are working toward a Smart Score of 90)
 
 

Due:

Blood on the River TnReady questions and Cold Read
We will finish any part of Blood on the River from the week (Chapter 5-8) and conclude with TNReady type questions.
Cold Read (text that is fresh to students)Students will read and answer questions to assess the week's learning.

Due:

Chapter 8 Blood on the River/Narrative Writing
Students will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.
a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation, using a narrator, and/or introducing characters.
b. Organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
c. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of
characters to situations.
d. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
Students will demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.
i. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context
Spelling/Phonics: Proofreading activity for long o and short o words
Writing: conclusion and transition words for narrative writing 
Reading:  Chapter 8 with questions
Mini Lesson on similes (similes in text pg. 52, 53, 56)
How does life on the ship compare with the time spent on the islands? What lesson does Captain Smith insist Samuel must learn? How has Captain Smith shown Samuel an example of channeling his anger? Use the text on pg59 to explain how Master Wingfield and Captain Smith’s priorities are different. How might the settlers’ first encounter with the natives alter their thinking about settling Virginia?

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 7 and Point of View
Students will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using an effective
technique, such as descriptive details and clear event sequences.  a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation, using a narrator, and/or introducing characters.
Students will compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated.
 
Spelling/Phonics:  sentences and analogies fill in activity
Writing:  Quick review of narrative rubric (focus on "hook" or orienting reader by establishing situation)
Reading:  Point of View mini Lesson
Vocabulary:  sermon, exalted, teeming, cannibals
Chapter 7 Blood on the River (reading with questioning)
What does Captain Smith’s story about being captured by the Turks reveal about his character?
How do Rev. Hunt’s actions save Captain Smith?
What does he ask for in return?

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 6 & Narrative Writing
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long o and short o sound words (analogies and fill-in sentences activity)
 
Reading: Review theme 
Blood on the River Chapter 6 with questions/discussion 
 
Describe James and how he is different from Samuel and Richard. What specific evidence is there in the scene where the boys play in the ocean?
Who is Captain Ratcliffe and what authority does he have? How do Captain Ratcliffe’s orders affect his men?
Samuel’s first job of cleaning pots felt meaningless. How did it end up being valuable experience? Samuel made a mistake when he first tried to clean the sword. How was Captain Smith’s response different from what Samuel was accustomed to? How do you think this may influence Samuel and Captain Smith’s relationship?
Vocabulary (Chapter 6) converge, writhing, agony, noose
Writing:  Discuss narrative rubric
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 5
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
Students will determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem and explain how it is
conveyed through details in the text;summarize the text. 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long o and short o sound words (sorting activity- long o with oa, ow, o-e, exception to closed syllables, and also short o with closed syllable)
 
Reading: Mini-Lesson for theme
Blood on the River Chapter 5 with questions/discussion 
How does Captain Smith’s response to being arrested and shackled influence how some of the men view the situation?
James and Samuel respond to Richard’s stories about natives in very different ways. What do their reactions tell you about them as characters?
What series of events lead to Captain Smith being a free man…for now?
Describe the group’s first interaction with natives.
Vocabulary (Chapter 5) snicker, gullible, eavesdropping, devoured
 

Due:

Accelerated Reader point goals are due today. AR points do not count as a grade, but students receive prizes and rewards for meeting and exceeding their goals. All students' AR point goals are written on their reading log in their Indian Binders.

Due:

Blood on the River - Flex Day
 
This day will be used to complete any writing assignments for Blood on the River as well as any reading and questioning for Chapters 4-6. IXL and AR may also be incorporated.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 6
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long o and short o sound words (analogies and fill-in sentences activity)
 
Reading: Review theme
Blood on the River Chapter 6 with questions/discussion 
 
Describe James and how he is different from Samuel and Richard. What specific evidence is there in the scene where the boys play in the ocean?
Who is Captain Ratcliffe and what authority does he have? How do Captain Ratcliffe’s orders affect his men?
Samuel’s first job of cleaning pots felt meaningless. How did it end up being valuable experience? Samuel made a mistake when he first tried to clean the sword. How was Captain Smith’s response different from what Samuel was accustomed to? How do you think this may influence Samuel and Captain Smith’s relationship?
Vocabulary (Chapter 6)
Writing: Narrative Rubric review and students will write a story from Captain Newport’s perspective about how he was convinced to place Captain Smith under arrest.

Due:

Common Assessment - 1st 9 weeks
 
Students will read 2 passages and answer questions based on the 2 passages.  In addition, students will answer grammar questions that are not based upon the passages. This is a common assessment for all 4th graders within Loudon County and has questions similar to those that students will see on TNReady.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 5
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long o and short o sound words (sorting activity- long o with oa, ow, o-e, exception to closed syllables, and also short o with closed syllable)
 
Reading: Mini-Lesson for theme
Blood on the River Chapter 5 with questions/discussion 
How does Captain Smith’s response to being arrested and shackled influence how some of the men view the situation?
James and Samuel respond to Richard’s stories about natives in very different ways. What do their reactions tell you about them as characters?
What series of events lead to Captain Smith being a free man…for now?
Describe the group’s first interaction with natives.
Vocabulary (Chapter 5)
Writing: Narrative Rubric viewing/discussion and students will organize thoughts to write a story from Captain Newport’s perspective about how he was convinced to place Captain Smith under arrest.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 4
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long o and short o sound words (introduction) The spelling test for this list will take place on Friday, October 19th.
 
ReadingBlood on the River Chapter 4 with questions/discussion 
How do the author’s words in the last paragraph on page 21 change the mood of the story? What led to the arrest of Captain Smith? How do the interactions between Smith, Wingate and Newport highlight how gentlemen and commoners view each other?
Vocabulary (Chapter 4):  astonishment, unshackled, unsteady, dispose, insisting, linger
Writing:  Students will be constructing a tweet to share the important events from Chapter 4.

Due:

Spelling List, Practice, and Test
We will have the same list for 2 weeks. In small groups, we will work on the words and do a variety of practice.  Students will have the spelling test on 9/28/18.  
 
List 3 contains words that have the long i and short i sound.
 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 3 and 4
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long i and short i sound words test (choose the correctly spelled word)
 
Vocabulary: racket, stench, decipher, philosophy, monotonous, livid
ReadingBlood on the River Chapter 3 with questions/discussion 
What difficulties do the travelers face early in the journey? How do the gentlemen react to these hardships? Who is Master Wingate and why does his opinion carry more weight than many others? What is Captain Smith’s response to the gentlemen?
 
Vocabulary(Chapter 4):  astonishment, unshackled, unsteady, dispose, insisting, linger
How does the author’s words in the last paragraph on page 21 change the mood of the story? What led to the arrest of Captain Smith? How do the interactions between Smith, Wingate and Newport highlight how gentlemen and commoners view each other?
 
Writing:  Students will be given information from Chapter 3 and must refer to details and examples in a text to make inferences and to explain what the text says.

Due:

Blood on the River Chapters 1-3
Describe in depth a character, setting,or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
 
Spelling: Review of long i and short i word list
Vocabulary:  Review of vocabulary introduced in chapters 1-3
Reading:  Students will use selections from chapters 1-3 to create a description of one of the following characters:  John Smith, Reverend Hunt, or Samuel (Popplet will be the platform used to produce the description.)
Students must use details from the text to support the description. 

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 3
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long i and short i sound words (completing analogies and sentences with spelling words)
Writing:  Compound Sentences Practice and Assessment
Vocabulary: racket, stench, decipher, philosophy, monotonous, livid
ReadingBlood on the River Chapter 3 with questions/discussion 
What difficulties do the travelers face early in the journey? How do the gentlemen react to these hardships? Who is Master Wingate and why does his opinion carry more weight than many others? What is Captain Smith’s response to the gentlemen?

Due:

Blood on the River Chapter 2
Students will describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific
details in a text, such as a character’s thoughts, words, or actions.
Students will use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. 
 
Spelling/Phonics: Long i and short i sound words (proofreading for misspelled spelling words)
Writing:  Compound Sentences Mini-Lesson
Vocabulary: gallows, magistrate, commotion, scoff, snickering, expedition, doomed
ReadingBlood on the River Chapter 2 with questions/discussion 
What advice does Rev. Hunt give Samuel about making decisions? What are the goals of the different people going to the New World? What about being Captain Smith’s page does Samuel think will be different for him? What is Captain Smith’s worry about the group of people being sent to the New World?
Writing Response question: Explain how Samuel could be described as both lucky and doomed.

Due:

Blood on the River - Background and page 1 of Chapter 1
Students refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
Students will produce complete sentences; recognize and correct inappropriate fragments and runons.
 
Spelling/Phonics: review with spelling (short i and long i sound)
 
Vocabulary: gentleman (warrior), commoner (rural, illiterate person), servant (one who works for a master) prophecy (prediction of the future from a divine source)
Reading:
Page 1 of Chapter 1 will be read (prophecy to Chief Powhatan)
Vocabulary: padlock, pawnshop, musty, locket, severed, crumple
We will also focus on the "exciting" verbs and descriptive language. (lumbers, squirm, bobbing) 
Reading: Chapter 1 will be completed 
Why does the boy feel justified in taking the locket from the shopkeeper? What was the result of his actions?
 
 

Due:

Blood on the River - Chapter 1
Students refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly; refer to details and examples in a text when drawing inferences from the text. 
Students will produce complete sentences; recognize and correct inappropriate fragments and runons.
 
Spelling/Phonics: sorting words by patterns (long i with igh, long i with i-e, long i exceptions like grind,short i with ui, short i closed syllables)
Writing:  Run-on practice using excerpts from attached document
Vocabulary: padlock, pawnshop, musty, locket, severed, crumple
We will also focus on the "exciting" verbs and descriptive language. (lumbers, squirm, bobbing) 
Reading: Chapter 1 will be completed with re-reading of the prophecy on page 1. 
Why does the boy feel justified in taking the locket from the shopkeeper? What was the result of his actions?

Due:

Frindle Character Analysis 
Students will describe the characters, setting, and events using details from the text.
Students will spell grade appropriate words correctly.
 
Spelling/Phonics: - patterns in long e and short e words (sentence completion activity)
Vocabulary: - narrator (person telling the story), characters (people or animals in the story), plot (what happens in the story), setting (when and where does the story take place), summary (using your own words to tell the main points/events of the story)
Reading: Selections from Frindle about the 2 main characters (Nicholas Allen and Mrs. Lorelei Granger)
Reading selections will be used to determine how each character looks, how each character acts, and what other characters think about the character).
 
Assessment: Students will create a Popplet (graphic organizer using technology) about one of the 2 characters and email to Mrs. Leming. Popplet will include a description of the character with details from the text to support the description.
 
 
 
 

Due:

Frindle Character Analysis - Day 1 of 2
Students will describe the characters, setting, and events using details from the text.
Students will spell grade appropriate words correctly.
 
Spelling/Phonics: - prefixes mis-, un-, re-, dis 
IXL
Vocabulary: - narrator (person telling the story), characters (people or animals in the story), plot (what happens in the story), setting (when and where does the story take place), summary (using your own words to tell the main points/events of the story)
Reading: Selections from Frindle about the 2 main characters (Nicholas Allen and Mrs. Lorelei Granger)
Reading selections will be used to determine how each character looks, how each character acts, and what other characters think about the character).
 
Assessment (Day 2): Students will create a Popplet (graphic organizer using technology) about one of the 2 characters and email to Mrs. Leming. Popplet will include descriptions of the character as well as evidence from the text to support the description.
 
 
 
 

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine deficit areas in reading. All students will be reviewing the data from their previous test prior to testing.
 
Spelling - words containing long e formed by ee, ea, ie, and open syllables
IXL - sentences and fragments, understanding characters in a story (Students are working toward a           Smart Score of 90)

Due:

Frindle Completion and Testing
Students will describe the characters, setting, and events using details from the text.
Students will spell grade appropriate words correctly.
 
Spelling/Phonics: - patterns in long e and short e words (proofreading activity)
Vocabulary: - forbidden (not allowed), consumers (people who buy stuff), commotion (noisy disturbance), villain (bad guy)
Reading: Chapter 13-15 of Frindle
 
Assessment: Literacy Skills AR test (36 questions) Students may refer back to the text when answering questions. 
 
 
 
 

Due:

Show Not Tell Writing
After classroom lessons, discussion, and practice, students will transform boring, telling sentences into more descriptive, showing sentences. An explanation of showing sentences are provided.

Due:

Frindle Quiz
Using the text, students will complete a comprehension assessment for Chapters 10-12. The assessment will require written responses as well as multiple choice options.
 
*Students should recycle the question when answering questions.
Example: How do the students know that Mrs. Granger isn't looking at their punishment papers anymore? Response with recycled question:  The students know that Mrs. Granger isn't looking at their punishment papers anymore because . . . 

Due:

Spelling List, Practice, and Test
Beginning on 8/20/18, students will have a spelling list. We will have the same list for 2 weeks. In small groups, we will work on the words and do a variety of practice.  Students will have the first spelling test on 8/31/18.  
 
List 1 contains words that have the long a and short a sound.
blade, gray, past, afraid, magic, delay, amaze, drain, maybe, break, sale, hang, stain, glass, raft, jail, crayon, fact, stale, steak

Due:

Frindle Quiz
Using the text, students will complete a comprehension assessment for Chapters 13-15. The assessment will require written responses as well as multiple choice options.

Due:

Frindle Quiz
Students will complete a comprehension assessment for Chapters 7-9 of Frindle. Students may use the novel when completing the assessment.

Due:

Frindle Quiz
Students will answer vocabulary and comprehension questions for Chapters 4-6 of Frindle. Students may use their copy of the novel when completing this assessment,

Due:

Frindle Quiz Chapters 1-3
Students will be assessed on both comprehension and vocabulary for Chapters 1-3 of our novel, Frindle. We are reading the novel in class.
 
Vocabulary includes:  deserved, custodian, crimson, monopoly, worshipped, acquire, frantically, glanced, guaranteed, procedures

Due:

Complete Sentences
Students will be producing complete sentences as well as correcting fragments and run-ons. This will be assessed using a variety of question types. An example of sentences, fragments, and run-ons are attached.

Due:

STAR READING
Students will be taking the STAR reading test in class. The results will be used to determine reading levels as well as to determine deficit areas in reading. We will take the test again later in the 9 weeks.

Due:

SMALL MOMENT PARAGRAPH
Students will be completing a narrative paragraph detailing one event from the summer following the guidelines presented about small moment writing. Any work not completed in class should be completed as homework. The assignment is worth 30 points. Please see the attached rubric for point details.