Loudon Elementary School

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3rd Grade Science Assignments

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Past Assignments

Due:

Local Weather Patterns & Weather Prediction (Day 4)

Students obtain and communicate information about different types of clouds by creating a Storm Spotter’s Guide. They engage in argument from evidence by using this information to analyze multiple scenarios and determine if a storm will occur and why.
 
Students explore patterns of changing clouds as a way to predict weather.
 
Standards:
3.ESS2.2 Associate major cloud types (cumulus, cumulonimbus, cirrus, stratus, nimbostratus) with weather conditions.

Due:

Local Weather Patterns & Weather Prediction (Day 3)

Students obtain and communicate information about different types of clouds by creating a Storm Spotter’s Guide. They engage in argument from evidence by using this information to analyze multiple scenarios and determine if a storm will occur and why.
 
Students explore patterns of changing clouds as a way to predict weather.
 
Standards:
3.ESS2.2 Associate major cloud types (cumulus, cumulonimbus, cirrus, stratus, nimbostratus) with weather conditions.

Due:

Local Weather Patterns & Weather Prediction (Day 2)

Students obtain and communicate information about different types of clouds by creating a Storm Spotter’s Guide. They engage in argument from evidence by using this information to analyze multiple scenarios and determine if a storm will occur and why.
 
Students explore patterns of changing clouds as a way to predict weather.
 
Standards:
3.ESS2.2 Associate major cloud types (cumulus, cumulonimbus, cirrus, stratus, nimbostratus) with weather conditions.

Due:

Local Weather Patterns & Weather Prediction

Students obtain and communicate information about different types of clouds by creating a Storm Spotter’s Guide. They engage in argument from evidence by using this information to analyze multiple scenarios and determine if a storm will occur and why.
 
Students explore patterns of changing clouds as a way to predict weather.
 
Standards:
3.ESS2.2 Associate major cloud types (cumulus, cumulonimbus, cirrus, stratus, nimbostratus) with weather conditions.

Due:

Water Cycle and Phases of Matter

Students carry out an investigation by using a model to observe evaporation. They engage in argument from evidence using observations from their investigation to explain what clouds are.
 
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between heated liquid water and the evaporation of gas water that forms into clouds
 
Standards:
3.ESS2.1 Explain the cycle of water on Earth

Due:

Seed Dispersal & Plant Life Cycle

Students carry out an investigation to determine if a food is a science fruit or vegetable. They cut open each food to determine if there are seeds. Students analyze this data to determine if the food is a fruit or vegetable.
 
Students use patterns to sort food as a science fruit or a science vegetable. Students learn that fruit (structure) contains seeds and helps them spread (function)
 
Standards:
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land and aquatic biomes

Due:

Pollination & Plant Reproduction (Day 2)

Students develop a model of a flower and bee to simulate pollination. With a partner, they carry out an investigation to determine how bees fly between flowers and cause pollination. Students analyze their data and construct an explanation for if their flower will produce seeds or not.
 
Students explore the pattern of similarities in life cycles among organisms. Students observe that a plant’s stigma (structure) is sticky to ‘catch’ pollen (function)
 
Standards:
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land and aquatic biomes
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
 

Due:

Pollination & Plant Reproduction

Students develop a model of a flower and bee to simulate pollination. With a partner, they carry out an investigation to determine how bees fly between flowers and cause pollination. Students analyze their data and construct an explanation for if their flower will produce seeds or not.
 
Students explore the pattern of similarities in life cycles among organisms. Students observe that a plant’s stigma (structure) is sticky to ‘catch’ pollen (function)
 
Standards:
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land and aquatic biomes
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
 

Due:

Magnets & Engineering

Mystery 5: How can you Unlock a Door Using a Magnet?
 
Students design a solution for a magnetic lock by developing a model.
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between two magnets as a way to so design solutions using the engineering process.

Due:

Magnets & Forces (Day 2)

Mystery 4: What can Magnets do?
 
Students ask questions about magnets and develop and carry out investigations to observe the different properties of them.
 
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between this distance of a magnet and the strength of the force. Students consider the cause and effect relationship between which direction two magnets are facing and if they will push or pull on one another. 
 

Due:

Magnets & Forces

Mystery 4: What can Magnets do?
 
Students ask questions about magnets and develop and carry out investigations to observe the different properties of them.
 
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between this distance of a magnet and the strength of the force. Students consider the cause and effect relationship between which direction two magnets are facing and if they will push or pull on one another. 
 

Due:

Friction & Pattern of Motion (Day 3)

Mystery 3: How can you go Faster Down a Slide?
 
Students use a model of a slide to carry out an investigation. They ask questions about different materials and weights and test their ideas to explore which combinations move the fastest down the slide. Students then complete a fair test to determine which material has the least friction. They engage in argument from evidence to share their findings.
 
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between a material’s surface and the amount of friction it has.
 

Due:

Friction & Pattern of Motion (Day 2)

Mystery 3: How can you go Faster Down a Slide?
 
Students use a model of a slide to carry out an investigation. They ask questions about different materials and weights and test their ideas to explore which combinations move the fastest down the slide. Students then complete a fair test to determine which material has the least friction. They engage in argument from evidence to share their findings.
 
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between a material’s surface and the amount of friction it has.
 

Due:

Friction & Pattern of Motion

Mystery 3: How can you go Faster Down a Slide?
 
Students use a model of a slide to carry out an investigation. They ask questions about different materials and weights and test their ideas to explore which combinations move the fastest down the slide. Students then complete a fair test to determine which material has the least friction. They engage in argument from evidence to share their findings.
 
Students consider the cause and effect relationship between a material’s surface and the amount of friction it has.
 

Due:

Balanced Forces & Engineering

Mystery 2: What makes Bridges so Strong?
 
Students define a problem - designing a bridge that will hold the most weight - and its constraints, it can only be made of paper. They collaborate with peers to design multiple solutions. They carry out investigations to test each of their prototypes, determine how to improve their design.
 
Students explore the relationship between the structure and function of different bridge designs.

Due:

Balanced Forces & Engineering

Mystery 2: What makes Bridges so Strong?
 
Students define a problem - designing a bridge that will hold the most weight - and its constraints, it can only be made of paper. They collaborate with peers to design multiple solutions. They carry out investigations to test each of their prototypes, determine how to improve their design.
 
Students explore the relationship between the structure and function of different bridge designs.

Due:

Balanced Forces & Engineering

Mystery 2: What makes Bridges so Strong?
 
Students define a problem - designing a bridge that will hold the most weight - and its constraints, it can only be made of paper. They collaborate with peers to design multiple solutions. They carry out investigations to test each of their prototypes, determine how to improve their design.
 
Students explore the relationship between the structure and function of different bridge designs.

Due:

Balanced & Unbalanced Forces (Day 2)

Mystery 1: How could you win a tug-of-war against a bunch of adults?
 
Students build a Hopper Popper to carry out an investigation about force and motion. They construct an explanation for which direction the forces act on the object, causing it to hop.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between the forces acting on an object and the direction of its motion.

Due:

Balanced & Unbalanced Forces

Mystery 1: How could you win a tug-of-war against a bunch of adults?
 
Students build a Hopper Popper to carry out an investigation about force and motion. They construct an explanation for which direction the forces act on the object, causing it to hop.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between the forces acting on an object and the direction of its motion.

Due:

Animal Survival & Heredity Unit Assessment

This summative assessment is a combination of short response and fill-in-the-blank questions. 
 
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's
biodiversity influence human resources.
 
3.LS2.1 Construct an argument to explain why some
animals benefit from forming groups.
 

Due:

Traits & Environmental Variation (Day 2)

Mystery 8: How long can people (and animals) survive in outer space?
 
Students measure their own physical traits (arm strength, balance, and height) and then make predictions about how these traits would change after living in outer space for a year. Students use this information to construct an explanation for how the environment can influence and change physical traits.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between the environment and its influence on physical traits (physical characteristics).
 
 
Assessment:
Traits in Space worksheet
 

Due:

Traits & Environmental Variation

Mystery 8: How long can people (and animals) survive in outer space?
 
Students measure their own physical traits (arm strength, balance, and height) and then make predictions about how these traits would change after living in outer space for a year. Students use this information to construct an explanation for how the environment can influence and change physical traits.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between the environment and its influence on physical traits (physical characteristics).
 
 
Assessment:
Traits in Space worksheet
 

Due:

Habitat Change & Engineering (Day 3)

Habitat Change & Engineering
Mystery 7: What’s the best way to get rid of mosquitoes?
 
Students obtain and evaluate information from different people who live in Pondville, a town with a severe mosquito problem. Then, using this information, students design solutions that will reduce the number of mosquitoes that live in Pondville.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between a change in the environment and the survival of organisms that live there. They recognize environments as a system, made up of interdependent parts that function as a whole.
 
 
Standards:
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
3.ETS1.2 Apply evidence or research to support a design solution. 
 
 
Assessment:
Problem Solver's worksheet

Due:

Habitat Change & Engineering (Day 2)

Habitat Change & Engineering
Mystery 7: What’s the best way to get rid of mosquitoes?
 
Students obtain and evaluate information from different people who live in Pondville, a town with a severe mosquito problem. Then, using this information, students design solutions that will reduce the number of mosquitoes that live in Pondville.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between a change in the environment and the survival of organisms that live there. They recognize environments as a system, made up of interdependent parts that function as a whole.
 
 
Standards:
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
3.ETS1.2 Apply evidence or research to support a design solution. 
 
 
Assessment:
Problem Solver's worksheet

Due:

Habitat Change & Engineering (Day 1)

Habitat Change & Engineering
Mystery 7: What’s the best way to get rid of mosquitoes?
 
Students obtain and evaluate information from different people who live in Pondville, a town with a severe mosquito problem. Then, using this information, students design solutions that will reduce the number of mosquitoes that live in Pondville.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between a change in the environment and the survival of organisms that live there. They recognize environments as a system, made up of interdependent parts that function as a whole.
 
 
Standards:
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
3.ETS1.2 Apply evidence or research to support a design solution. 
 
 
Assessment:
Problem Solver's worksheet

Due:

Matter

What are the states of matter?
 
 
Assessment: Sorting activity (attached)

Due:

Why do dogs wag their tails? (Day 4)

Animal Groups & Survival
Mystery 6 Why do dogs wag their tails?
 
Students carefully observe animals that live in groups in order to obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about animal social behavior. Using the evidence from their observations, students engage in an argument to support their claim that animals form groups to help them survive.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between animals living in a group and the members of that group surviving.
 
Standards:
3.LS2.1 Construct an argument to explain why some animals benefit from forming groups. 
 
Assessment:
Field Journal 

Due:

Matter

How can I observe, describe, and measure properties of matter?
 
 
Assessment:What am I? (Attached)

Due:

Mystery 6 Why Do Dogs Wag Their Tails? (Day 3)

Day 2
Animal Groups & Survival
Mystery 6 Why do dogs wag their tails?
 
Students carefully observe animals that live in groups in order to obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about animal social behavior. Using the evidence from their observations, students engage in an argument to support their claim that animals form groups to help them survive.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between animals living in a group and the members of that group surviving.
 
Standards:
3.LS2.1 Construct an argument to explain why some animals benefit from forming groups. 
 
Assessment:
Field Journal 

Due:

Why do dogs wag their tails? (Day 2)

Animal Groups & Survival
Mystery 6 Why do dogs wag their tails?
 
Students carefully observe animals that live in groups in order to obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about animal social behavior. Using the evidence from their observations, students engage in an argument to support their claim that animals form groups to help them survive.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between animals living in a group and the members of that group surviving.
 
Standards:
3.LS2.1 Construct an argument to explain why some animals benefit from forming groups. 
 
Assessment:
Field Journal 

Due:

Matter

How can I observe, describe, and measure properties of matter?
 
 
Assessment: Descriptive writing (attached)

Due:

Why do dogs wag their tails?

Animal Groups & Survival
Mystery 6 Why do dogs wag their tails?
 
Students carefully observe animals that live in groups in order to obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about animal social behavior. Using the evidence from their observations, students engage in an argument to support their claim that animals form groups to help them survive.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between animals living in a group and the members of that group surviving.
 
Standards:
3.LS2.1 Construct an argument to explain why some animals benefit from forming groups. 
 
Assessment:
Field Journal 

Due:

Can Selection Happen without People (Day 3)

Heredity, Variation, & Selection
Mystery 5: Can Selection Happen without People?
 
Students carry out an investigation by using a model to simulate the introduction of a predator species on Lizard Island. Students simulate multiple generations of lizards, analyzing and interpreting the data after each one. They use this data to engage in argument from evidence to support their claim about how the offspring change from the original lizards.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between a change in the environment and the survival of organisms that inhabit it. They recognize environments as a system, made up of interdependent parts that function as a whole. They can be stable and change over time at different rates of speed.
 
Standards:
3.LS4.1 Explain the cause and effect relationship between a naturally changing environment and an organism's ability to survive.
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land and aquatic biomes.
 3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
 
Assessment:
How many Lizards worksheet

Due:

Can Selection Happen without People Day 2

Heredity, Variation, & Selection
Mystery 5: Can Selection Happen without People?
 
Students carry out an investigation by using a model to simulate the introduction of a predator species on Lizard Island. Students simulate multiple generations of lizards, analyzing and interpreting the data after each one. They use this data to engage in argument from evidence to support their claim about how the offspring change from the original lizards.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between a change in the environment and the survival of organisms that inhabit it. They recognize environments as a system, made up of interdependent parts that function as a whole. They can be stable and change over time at different rates of speed.
 
Standards:
3.LS4.1 Explain the cause and effect relationship between a naturally changing environment and an organism's ability to survive.
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land and aquatic biomes.
 3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
 
Assessment:
How many Lizards worksheet

Due:

Can Selection Happen without People

Heredity, Variation, & Selection
Mystery 5: Can Selection Happen without People?
 
Students carry out an investigation by using a model to simulate the introduction of a predator species on Lizard Island. Students simulate multiple generations of lizards, analyzing and interpreting the data after each one. They use this data to engage in argument from evidence to support their claim about how the offspring change from the original lizards.
 
Students recognize the cause and effect relationship between a change in the environment and the survival of organisms that inhabit it. They recognize environments as a system, made up of interdependent parts that function as a whole. They can be stable and change over time at different rates of speed.
 
Standards:
3.LS4.1 Explain the cause and effect relationship between a naturally changing environment and an organism's ability to survive.
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land and aquatic biomes.
 3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
 
Assessment:
How many Lizards worksheet

Due:

Heredity, variation, and selection

Heredity, Variation, and Selection

Mystery 4: What kind of Animals Might There be in The future?

Students analyze the traits of parent dogs to determine which puppy they could have. They construct explanations about which traits the puppy gets from each parent
 
Students recognize patterns in traits between parents and offspring.
 
Standards:
3.LS4.1 Explain the cause and effect relationship between a naturally changing environment and an organism's ability to survive.
3.LS4.2 Infer that plant and animal adaptations help them survive in land aquatic biomes. 
3.LS4.3 Explain how changes to an environment's biodiversity influence human resources.
 
 
Assessment:
Designer Dogs worksheet